If you were to take all the different types of complaints that landlords and property managers have to deal with on a regular basis, there is no doubt that it would stretch on for miles. From noisy neighbors to weird smells to clogged pipes, there is simply a significant amount of upkeep required to, well, to keep up a rental property.

But whereas clogged pipes are problem easily solved, there are some issues that may be cause for complaint but difficult for you as a property owner (or manager) to resolve for yourself. Like noise from the outside. When you have one tenant complaining about another, it’s easy enough to review leases and have conversations to solve the problem. But when you have a nearby building install a helicopter pad, an airport reroute flight paths, or an inexplicable uptick in local sirens, it can be much more difficult to handle complaints. That’s why we’ve compiled a few tips to help you deal with those noise complaints that don’t have a simple fix.

Soundproof Fencing

One of the more recent technological developments that can help with a noisy building is a soundproof fence. These fences, while not necessarily the most aesthetically pleasing with their solid, usually black, construction, can keep out (or in!) a large percentage of noise. They are even used on construction projects, to block the sound from railways, or even for dog kennels. If your building and noise source are situated in such a way that a fence may be able to help, it is certainly worth considering.

Soundproof Windows

Having good windows with strong seals is a good idea anyway, since it can save you a lot of money on energy. An added bonus is that double paned windows that keep heat and air conditioning inside can also help to keep noise on the outside.

Go to the Source

Depending on what the source of the noise is, you may be able to talk to another property owner and see if they can’t help you to sort out the issue. Whether it is a nearby homeowner with barking dogs or a renter who tends to have parties late into the night, a conversation may be all it takes. Of course, if that doesn’t do the trick, you may have to get the police involved.

Lower the Rent

If the noise is something completely out of your control, there may be nothing you can do at all to fix it. If this is the case, you may consider lowering the rent on your vacant units and even offering a discount to existing tenants so that they don’t bolt as soon as their lease is up.

Don’t Try to Trick New Tenants

Finally, no matter what steps you end up taking in order to correct your noise situation, you shouldn’t not try to trick potential tenants by not notifying them about the problem before they sign a lease. This can lead to all sorts of much worse problems and you’ll be much better off finding a tenant that can handle the noise.

Have you ever had a problem like this at one of your rental properties?  How did you handle it?  Let us know in the comments!